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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the local economy. positive effects in terms of lower training costs and turnover and less lost time at work and dedicated employees, so small businesses, mid size and large businesses benefit from in, as well as local government because they don't have as many people relying on social services. so, the data doesn't back that up. in fact, it's a positive thing he when we do it in a planful fashion to raise the minimum wage. >> on this issue, just like an economist. on the one hand, on the other hand, there are studies on both sides. but jonas there is an argument that higher minimum wages reducing turnover, which lessens the costs of employers and could incase employments. >> you would never leave the job if you could get it, it's a pretty good wage. negatives and benefits. both sides of kind of right. if the minimum wage is low $2, it wouldn't disrupt the job market. if it's $50, high unemployment, but a-- there's obviously a level between there where the negatives would exceed the positives. there are positives, workers would get more money under the plan and not outsourced to china. you n
drones flying over the united states. higher gasoline prices, higher taxes, weakening the economy and taxes, weakening the economy and harris on what the future holds. at a dry cleaner, taxes, weakening the economy and harris on what the future holds. we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we all work remotely so this is a big deal, our first full team gathering! i wanted to call on a few people. ashley, ashley marshall... here. since we're often all on the move, ashley suggested we use fedex office to hold packages for us. great job. [ applause ] thank you. and on a protocol note, i'd like to talk to tim hill about his tendency to u all caps in emails. [ shouting ] oh i'm sorry guys. ah sometimes the caps lock gets stuck on my keyboard. hey do you wanna get a drink later? [ male announcer ] hold packages at any fedex office location. hey do you wanna get a drink later? progressive direct and other
to the economy. >> is this short -- >> it will ultimately work out if the economy can get by with the back to normal payroll tax. this could juice it back around. there's no perfect plan the government can do, but it's possible this payroll tax cut could be lowered in the recession and raisedded in boom times to make up for the cut. lou: good evening, evrybody the day can be described as quiet from washington to the middle east, where as two days for market selloffs brought i told you sos from some wall street gurus. today's triple digit rally in the dow was unobserved by those who lost the narrative. as surrogates and private campaign force, organizing for action, worked to upend the second amendment, the president, himself, seems most willing to put a electoral risk, and the democratic senators and they had the elections, and facing constituents on gun control, trying to explain the president's early enthusiasms and why he's silent about it now. the president privately meeting with white house reporters today who took with it, pins, cameras, or anything with which to record the president
and his team realized that they can't get to their spending nirvana without getting this economy growing. and the economy is hobbling along, even if slow runners can across the finish line. neil: we may be back to levels of the market where we were five years ago. but it has been a steady climb back to worst -- excuse me, from e worse. net net, is a good barack obama? >> yes, i am for it. we are all investors. we all want to see this thing improve. i agree with bob that economics is about choices. neil: i do buy your argument about the slowly inching back economy here. not in the gangbuster fashion, but enough to compel money that has been nervous. and sitting on the sidelines come back in. but the way it is being committed is not to expand plans and operations as much as it is to retrench buying out a competitor. you're really not expanding your business but you're really just retention the existing business. you are not heralding the success of what is going on. you could argue it is part of the bunker mentality. explain the mechanics of what is happening. >> i think you're absolutely
raise taxes, you are going to cut that -- those people who are bringing prosperity to the economy. >> is this short -- >> it will ultimately work out if the economy can get by with the back to normal payroll tax. this could juice it back around. there's no perfect plan the government can do, but it's possible this payroll tax cut could be lowered in the recession and raisedded in boom times to make up for the cut. wwn time. >> we did. happy friday, everyone. adam: i'm in for melanee stubbs. -- melissa francis. both sides red gi to let it happen, all hope is not lost. david walker, former u.s. comptroller says there's a possible fix, and he joins us to explain his plan. plus, prepare yourself for a meat shortage. forget soaring prices, the cuts could bring the beef industry to a halt. steak lovers get used to eating tofu. an expert is here to tell us why. close up for the oscars, but commercials, as you and i know them, could take a final bow. a breakthrough in the industry allows advertisers to control what you see in realtime. we could watch the same oscars, but very different co
these markets and the economy is headed, well, we will be talking with and welcome to our own rick adonis, senior u.s. economist for deutsche bank security. good to have you here. your year. i mean, we have people walking around with long faces. all parts of the country because they're unemployed. the economy is contracting. and they just don't understand how nice it is to be on wall street. >> well, it is chilly down on wall street. i assure you. but we are seeing some positive signs in the economy. so, yes of the fourth quarter did not look so great. the best top-level gdp number. but when you look beneath the surface we see some important undercurrents. does green shoots cut consumer spending. lou: seeing that come back. >> consumer spending is picking up. the investment which had been contracting. nav is picking up again. the housing market is picking up. but the domestic economy looks dece. it needs time to run until that an employer rate is down, but it increasingly looks like we are building some momentum. lou: you know, i really am. and i am delighted to see your optimism and to h
that just for day-to-day living seems to me this is a bad sign. >> sure. it's a sign that the economy is still weak and that any policies that take money out of the hands of the middle class and that lee deuce their disposable income is going to have a negative impact on the economy, and it comes as an opportune time for policymakers in washington as they contemplate the sequester cuts which currently constituted hits the middle class hard, further weakens the economy. it's the wrong thing to do right now. what we should do is alternate ways. adam: alternate, i got to ask you, it's a perfect storm of bad news. about to cut, the sequester cuts in government spending, people lose jobs, less money out there. they can't cut taxes again or can they and should they? >> what we need to do right now is think about alternatives to the sequester cuts and the solution, i think, is for republicans in congress to recognize that tax breaks and other spending programs in the tax code are the equivalent of government spending program, and if they encyst on cutting government and reducing the size of
idea. the effects on the economy is clear. the economic recovery is being held back by washington. goldman sachs chief u.s. economist out with a new report, saying that the economy will continue to go well below its potential. most consumers probably weren't aware of the hit to their disposable income until they receive their mid-january paycheck. one republican pollster in a new report rights that we have entered a new phase for the dysfunction and paralysis in washington is having a significant impact on how consumers feel about the overall state of the economy and their personal financial situation. the drop in consumer confidence, he says, is directly related to a lack of competence in our current political leaders. consumer confidence has taken a hit, a big one since post-world war ii history. already there is evidence of a slowdown in consumer spending. reports that wal-mart had its worst start to its month in seven years. the payroll tax hikes may be starting to bite. gas prices are up 51 cents in the last two months. prices are up every single day since the middle of janua
believe the world economy's improving, that's another area to continue to improve from the equity's side as well. liz: do you believe that, ben? do you believe the economy's improving? >> i do. liz: slightly; right? i don't know why -- i'm not putting on a cheer leading skirt -- >> please, please do. >> it's improving if you're a refiner, right about that. liz: leave it to elliot to get off the cheer leading skirt -- >> killing it, killing it. liz: exactly. ignore this world economy, great conversation, thank you so much. our one and only floor, under the weather, hmos like humana and united health with a great deal of exposure to medicare rates. here's why. rates could go down next year based on what's being said by the center for medicare and medicaid services. peter barnes followed the story from washington. isn't that what people want? rates to go down? >> well, not if you're investing in health insurance stocks; right, liz? health insurance companies, and the industry plans to fight back on some proposedded cuts that would hit something called medicare advantage, the popular hmo ver
trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> at 20 minutes past the hour, i have your fox news minute. a south african judge has allowed oscar pistorious to go free on $113,000 bail. the track star is charged with the murder of his girlfriend on valentine's day. oscar pistorious says he shot the model accident late thinking she was a intruder in his house. prosecutors say it was premeditated murder. a fire department official says only the flight team was on board the chopper when it went down. it was heading to pick up a patient 70 miles away. cuban president has raised the possibility of retiring, but did not say when he may make that decision. the 82-year-old leader made the comment in savanna. those are your headlines on the fox business network. back to ashley. ashley: all right. thank you very much. shibani: representatives from boeing meeting with the faa today. solutions for the battery fires that have grounded the 7873 minor. peter barnes is in washington. peter: top boeing executives are expected to propose a new design for
again and the word recession is back on the table. good morning, everyone. can our economy handle what's happening at the pump? good question. you've seen it every day for more than a month and they've changed the signs at the gas station and prices have gone straight up. today, triple-a says regular costs 3.74 a gallon. we're closing in on a 50 cent gain just this year. four big population states are at or very close to $4 a gallon already. all right, now shall the impact. every penny that gas goes up takes 1.2 billion dollars from consumer spending, like a tax. and it comes on top of other tax increaseses that cut everybody's paycheck and will slow a weak economy and some say brings recession that much closer. watch out. "varney & company" is about to begin. [ male announcer ] at his current pace, bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him a fresh perspective on hisortfolio. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more approp
's a measure of the overall economy. wal-mart took in less money. wal-mart sales were down. wal-mart tells the economy's story. what's going on here? well, start with gas prices, up again today, by the way. up nearly 50 cents this year, you can't spend at wal-mart when your gas costs so much more, so suddenly. and then there's taxes up for everyone as of january the 1st. you spend less when your paycheck shrinks, throw in rising unemployment and a president who wants another round of tax hikes and you've got a weak economy. telling me, really? is it all the republicans fault? "varney & company" is about to begin. [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having iplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new ansmission. [ coyote how ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> all eyes on the market this morning. question, will the selloff continue? remember, two
the sequestered because it is a wholly unnecessary will run the economy if it were to take place. >> except there were others in the president's party like former democratic national committee chairman howard dean suggesting the president should let the sequester happen to slice the pentagon's budget. telling the huffington post, i am in favor of the sequestered. it is tough on things that i care about a lot, but the fact of the matter is, you are not going to get another chance to cut the defense budget in the way that it needs to be cut. white house officials disagree. as does the outgoing defense secretary leon panetta warned such deep cuts could leave america with as second-rate military. lou: you will remember republicans were furious before the election and the white house was not complying with the warrant act which is a law that basically says employers need to warn employees about upcoming furloughs. the white house pushed back on all of that. now they are releasing those for loan notices. remember, people the 30-60 days in some cases on notices, which means these furloughs will ta
's what is "money" tonight. it is eight days until the sequester plows into the u.s. economy. who is really facing the most financial pain? how can you make money from it? today's panel cuts through all the washington noise to get you some answers. >>> plus a breakthrough for health care. thousands of self-serve kiosks come to wal-mart and sam's club stores. can free health screenings prove a game-changer for providing care? the founder and ceo of the company behind them joins us. >>> ditch that fancy trip to the caribbean and come get baked in colorado. call jeff sipc oli. it gets green light from colorado regulators. businesses plan to lure tourists and turn colorado into the next amsterdam. will be a hit or the next buzz kill. even when they say it is not it is always about money adam: good evening to you. just eight days and a few hours until the latest government improsed fiscal disaster. eight days until cuts that both sides say they will completely crater the economy take place. and just eight days until budget cuts could tank wall street and the stock market rally which up
, and now soaring utility bills. this is spreading to every fascet of u.s. economy we're told that winter has weeks left, growing signs this evening this keeps up the same could be said of the recovery itself. phil, you follow this, what is going on? >> you know we had everything that could go wrong, go wrong. we had refinery issues, hurricane sandy, and refinery fires, this is around the country, on top of that because of fed fed policy, -- federal reserve policy the price of oil has gun up over $10 a barrel in under a month, that is a recipe for sharply rising prices. neil: normally that stuff creeps up in other areas not good. >> i actually am more amount mystic. -- optimistic, fuel costs represent about 4% of pretax income. i think that the consumer has lost that payroll tax credit, they are still spending they are not increasing it but they are maintaining their baseline. other thing that should bring optimism they are increasing level of nonrevolving borrowing, they are setting themselves up to purchase big ticket items, under the stats, give you a sense there is a left of consumer
that there is an average wage that is probably twice the national average. they have high leverage in the economy. there is going to be an unintended consequence, unfortunately, if there is not a deal made in 11 days. ashley: would you agree that defense spending needs to be reformed? it may be the wrong way to do it, but it seems to be the only way. >> the suddenness. in the past, abbott there -- in the past, there was a planned slowdown of an amount of what we are facing here. we have already taken a 12% cut for defense contractors and they are looking at another seven-12% again. ashley: how much does this compromise national security? >> well, clearly, one of the ways that will be cut in and unplanned fashion is to stop paying for discretionary things like language interpreters and servicers, as well as, maintenance and operations. that means we will not be able to deploy our forces overseas. whether it be for military purposes or expeditionary purposes for humanitarian aid. ashley: tom, quickly, they are supposed to give 60 day notices. if these cuts go into effect in 11 days, that will not h
. stuart: tell me the truth. do you think that president obama really values growth for our economy or redistribution of the wealth? >> i think he's far more in the camp of redistribution than growth. and his central campaign theme he made clear was redistributing wealth and he's done it, kept his promise. >> let me read this for you. the congressman henry waxman demands more executive orders from the president. in a letter to the white house, waxman wants the president to issue new regulations on everything from power plants to oil refineries and even household appliances. henry waxman, a member of congress, he wants the president to go around congress with his voice. >> we have the separation of powers in this country. something that's hugely important. with a waxman is recommending and i recognize just waxman represents to me a liberal, too. and i'm against conservative or moderate as liberal. but the idea of president going around congress to get things done, especially when he gets up in his state of the union and says that the sequester is not his work, but the work of congres
that are going to be not crushing the economy at a time when it is very fragile as it is. so there are certain things i think we can agree upon but right now, there is act absolute gridlock. washington is a mess. we need to work together in a truly bipartisan manner as americans first with our backs against the economic wall. we need to do it together and i don't see anything like that happening anytime soon. sandra: so, kevin, senator brown sounds very doubtful right now. maybe the timing is a little bit different this time around? we're days from the deadline of the sequester on march 1st. maybe now the pssure will help something get done and maybe they will take a second look at the simpson-bowles plan number two? >> we can hope so i think really what is going on here that bowles and simpson are tired of, you know, basically being a front for president obama's inaction and so they have come out with a proposal that, you know, sure there is 600 billion more in tax revenues than republicans would like, but it is not that bad of a proposal compared to certainly what the democrats are proposing
to make the slightest bit of improvement in the economy. gerri: the number for the sequester will be half a percent. we are not even talking about curbing growth, but we are talking about a small backtrack. at the end of the day, we are not talking about a lot of money. but i would like to ask you that the president likes wants to spend $50 billion on infrastructure. didn't he do that just a few years ago? didn't we find that spending on roads and bridges was difficult because shovel ready wasn't so already? >> the stimulus was $800 billion. the president understood at that time that the american people would buy into anything because they were so desperate. the fact of the matter is when we look back on it, there wasn't enough shovel ready jobs. we didn't see what was promised, it has been about 80% almost the entire presidency. the american people are disappointed time and time again. expectations are low. the president taking stimulus, 50 billion. you could say, well, at least it's not 500 billion, that's many that we don't have. >> there is a story about congress having approval ratin
surrounding the economy, dow jones has one of the best january in years. if the dow has a great january, oil prices likely will follow. that is what we're seeing. gasoline prices following. not only that, refineries haven't necessarily switched over to summer blend of gasoline but are preparing to do so for the all-out production will bring, not only that, a job in that as well. sandra: i want to challenge you one thing. he said gasoline prices will track the price of oil, but let's throw out the price of oil and gasoline this year. oil prices up year-to-date 4.1% while gasoline prices are up three times that, more than 14%. so gasoline prices are way outpacing the price of oil. >> that happens from time to time. gasoline prices didn't necessarily go as low as oil prices. this last november. right now a lot of it is a primary bottleneck why prices haven't followed crude oil so closely. we still have that bottleneck in the way causing a spike in gasoline prices, refineries moving production preparing for summer driving season. sandra: the bottom line, oil prices have gone up, we cannot refine
, not be bailed out then this economy creates jobs and allows people to move ahead as abraham lincoln said improve their lot in life. government hurts' opportunities come to keep people in their place and is not a how to create things. free the people. they will do its. [laughter] john: you may kitchen ventilation systems in the kitchen to suck up the bad air but government wants to make your business better so then they will help all of the of the if you focus on 79 pages of regulation, and many manufacturers are very small, it is too abstract it is impossible to read. >> notice of proposed rulemaking subsection 13, a complete missing in action is unintelligible then they try to make your fans used less electricity. so we have a paradox but he wants to regulate us to death so with creativity with the small investments made over a long period of time and government dampens that for the economy. >> keep in mind if you don't succeed in a tr free market even if you meet the needs and wants of other people. john: not the caricature f obama that he pints of us being greedy cackling over your money. >>
this is a more modest issue. we are putting a lot of fiscal drag. that is a lot of money for an economy only growing 2%. my concern is not a major selloff, but a growth disappointment in the first half. we are looking at a correction, should that happen. connell: we will have this debate and continue to have it. some people are saying that this of kuester is a really big deal. it is in a slow bleed. it is not as big of a deal. >> you cannot look at it in isolation. in total, again, it is not a game changer, but it will be a drag for the first part of the year. connell: pretty good acronym. thanks a lot. >> thank you, connell. dagen: gas prices at a record high for this time of year. we have the chief oil analyst for the oil price information service, tom kloza. you didn't really see this coming, did you? the run-up that we got so early in the year. >> i did not see it coming so early in the year. it is pretty typical of the run-up. there are a couple of extra things that are contributing this year. we have seen this movie before and we know how it ends. dagen: talk about the refineries in th
this year, we're on track to take what, 60, 70 billion dollars out of the economy. question, why is this happening? former shell oil president john hofmeister, 10:45 this morning. listen to this, not only has colorado legalized recreational use of marijuana, he wants to use pot as a tourist draw, a tourist attraction, if you're over 21, feel free to smoke up. forget amsterdam, hop a flight to denver and light up a joint. we'll have more on this at the top of the hour, including how this could be a boom for lawyers. and i bet a lot of people will try to bring pot home from colorado not allowed and a defense attorney for you, all right. let's get back home, shall we? and so far, a tranquil america, we are 128 points away from the all time high this is, and up next, we will ask a trader if investors really care about spending cuts, sequester, do they care the at all. the opening bell next. [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having triplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmissi
that depend on them, or would they rather put hundreds of thousands of jobs and our entire economy at risk just to protect a few special interest tax loopholes that benefit only the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations? that's the choice. are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their job because you want to protect some special interest tax loophole? are you willing to have teachers laid off or kids not have access to head start? or deeper cuts in student loan programs? just because you want to protect the special tax interest loophole that the vast majority of americans don't benefit from. that's the choice. that's the question. and this is not an abstraction. there are people whose livelihoods are at stake. there are communities that will be impacted in a negative way. i know that sometimes all this squabbling in washington seems very abstract. and in the abstract, people like the idea, you know, there must be some spending we can cut. there must be some waste out there. there absolutely is, but this isn't the right way to do it. so my door is open. i put cuts an
the path europe has gone down with a statement economy and cons of unemployment, tons of people taxed to death, or the other path with a more economic freedom and people can decide what they want to do, government isn't taking care of you from cradle to grave and they make that hard choice because this is not sustainable. neil: could also be stating something america's might well come and be willing to pay a little bit more if they have a government that will do a little bit, presumably a lot more and might be okay with it but throwing it out there that it is inevitable, so what are we going to do? >> i think a lot of people pay a little bit more. if you want to the american public and civic and fix everything by putting 20%, everybody would say okay. 25, 26, 27% and cut the investment in the economy and half, a catastrophe for our ki kids. but that is where the money is at a middle-class is where the money is at. neil: i guess i want to get back to the basic math argument because half the people of this country don't pay any federal income taxes. some are military, some of gotten to
in this economy. this is not a good thing. gerri: i want to take you back to something that you just said that i have heard before and i think is really interesting. you say obamacare will collapse under its own weight. how is that going to happen? >> well, i think that that tax burden is causing revolt. i think you're going to see a real problems with the implementation of this. states are having trouble putting these exchanges together other states are not going to do it. i think at every step of the way they are missing deadlines and the implementation. gerri: well, the compliance rate, i think it will be interesting to see you get someone in goes a long illness. you have been absolutely right. you know, we have been talking a lot about the different things that people have to do. h&r block and feels like they have to educate people on what they're going to end up paying because they realized that a lot of their customers who are low-income will end up losing there refunds because of it. there are so many unintended consequences. are you hearing from your constituents about this? are they ups
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)